Don’t Ghost Your Therapist!

Fall is in the air, y’all!

Autumn is one of my favorite seasons thanks to pumpkin spice, cooler weather, and all things spooky!

One thing that shouldn’t have to be scary is breaking up with your therapist!

Think about it, you have invested time, energy, and some darn hard work into this collaborative relationship!

One thing clients may not be aware of is therapists are trained from the beginning of treatment to anticipate your termination.

We have been preparing with you for your time with us to end, not because we don’t enjoy working with you, because the goal of therapy is for you to be ready to move forward with the tools learned without the training wheels of the therapist to support you in each step.

If you are feeling that you have completed many of the goals you came into treatment with and are ready to move towards termination, be vocal about your feelings and needs moving forward with your therapist.

If finding a good fit is difficult for you, try bringing up what is not working for you with your current therapist before jumping on the ghosting train

When you ghost your therapist, you miss the opportunity to have a healthy closure experience. Practicing a healthy goodbye is an important part of the therapeutic process.

A good therapist will support you in your choice, discusss your progress, and provide referrals for continued care if necessary.

It is not your job to take care of your therapist’s feelings! Yes…it may feel scarier than walking into a haunted house, but don’t doubt your ability to face your fears head on!

Happy Healing! 👻

Michelle Smith LMHC, MS

Licensed Psychotherapist

The Struggle with Self Compassion

As a therapist, I see clients who come to the counseling office with numerous issues. Loss of a relationship, job changes, anxiety, depression, grief, trauma, illness, or just plain unhappiness with the way life currently is going.

One thing that is common amongst humans. We are innately wired to be on the outlook for danger, always assessing their surroundings to protect themselves. It is our habitual nature to turn towards the negative, and blame outward sources for our unhappiness.

Today, this habit serves less of a purpose, and can manifest in an outward blaming game.

When clients come to therapy, initially there is what therapists call a “presenting problem”. My boss, my wife, my job, my circumstances, if only I had the money, the promotion, the relationship.. the list goes on.

By creating a safe environment for understanding and growth, slowly clients come to realization that their perception, not circumstances, must change for true growth to occur.

And that growth isn’t linear. It doesn’t look pretty written in glitter ink. But it’s honest. And it’s vulnerable. And it’s real. And honestly isn’t that what we are all here for in the end?

The struggle with self compassion is, we have to be vulnerable with ourselves and look in the dark corners and crevices, deep down in the root of the mind that may have memories and circumstances that don’t feel good.

By exploring these emotions in a safe environment with a trusted person, self compassion can begin to manifest on the journey to healing.

Are you ready to truly forgive yourself? Are you ready to look in the dark corners and roots to heal?

Rumi once said “maybe you are searching amongst the branches, for what only appears in your roots”

Wishing you health and wellness!

Michelle Smith

LMHC, MS

michelle.smith.lmhc@gmail.com