Don’t Ghost Your Therapist!

Fall is in the air, y’all!

Autumn is one of my favorite seasons thanks to pumpkin spice, cooler weather, and all things spooky!

One thing that shouldn’t have to be scary is breaking up with your therapist!

Think about it, you have invested time, energy, and some darn hard work into this collaborative relationship!

One thing clients may not be aware of is therapists are trained from the beginning of treatment to anticipate your termination.

We have been preparing with you for your time with us to end, not because we don’t enjoy working with you, because the goal of therapy is for you to be ready to move forward with the tools learned without the training wheels of the therapist to support you in each step.

If you are feeling that you have completed many of the goals you came into treatment with and are ready to move towards termination, be vocal about your feelings and needs moving forward with your therapist.

If finding a good fit is difficult for you, try bringing up what is not working for you with your current therapist before jumping on the ghosting train

When you ghost your therapist, you miss the opportunity to have a healthy closure experience. Practicing a healthy goodbye is an important part of the therapeutic process.

A good therapist will support you in your choice, discusss your progress, and provide referrals for continued care if necessary.

It is not your job to take care of your therapist’s feelings! Yes…it may feel scarier than walking into a haunted house, but don’t doubt your ability to face your fears head on!

Happy Healing! 👻

Michelle Smith LMHC, MS

Licensed Psychotherapist

Language of Love

Valentine’s Day is right around the corner which means never ending advertisements to buy more chocolates, diamonds, roses, and expensive getaways to show the one you love how much you care.

Are these advertisements even factual? Is the only way to express your admiration by spending hundreds or even thousands of dollars? Psychology disagrees.

Gary Chapman, a leader in couple and relationship research, has founded one of the key factors to successful marriages and relationships around the world is to understand a person’s love language.

Just like each person is individual in their likes, dislikes, thinking patterns, habits, and cultural background, we also are unique in the way we best receive love.

Chapman identifies The 5 Love Languages that bring insight into the best way to approach emotional intimacy with our partner.

Words of Affirmation: Feeling wanted, valued, and positively praised in a relationship is a priority for a WOA partner.

  • If you love language is WOA, you probably enjoy when your partner compliments you and genuinely shares with their words how much they care through conversation, writing, notes, etc.
  • TIP: If your lover’s primary love language is words of affirmation, try purchasing a dry erase board specifically to write quick love notes back and forth in the midst of the hustle and bustle of everyday life.

Quality Time: Spending uninterrupted, engaged, and focused time with your partner. This does NOT include sitting in the same living room working simultaneously.

  • If your love language is Quality Time, you probably enjoy exploring new experiences with your partner, whether it’s taking a pottery class or going on a road trip, you know your partner cares when they take the time from their busy schedule to spend with you.
  • TIP: If your lover’s primary love language is quality time, try planning an adventurous date idea for V-day and surprise your partner. Participating in new experiences with your loved one is a wonderful way to increase your emotional connection.

Physical Touch: is not just about sex, but all forms of physical intimacy.

  • If your love language is physical touch, you feel loved when your partner shows their love physically by holding you hand, rubbing your scalp in bed, or massages your feet.
  • TIP: If your lover’s primary love language in physical touch, try increasing the amount of playful touch during your date night to increase affection or plan a date that includes massage such as a luxurious spa day away from the kids.

Acts of Service: includes helping with any task that will take stress off of our partner such as taking out the trash, cooking dinner, paying a bill that is late etc.

  • If your primary love language is acts of service, you feel appreciated when your partner takes the time to notice you could use help and does the task at hand to support the family system continuing to function optimally.
  • TIP: If your lover’s primary love language is acts of service, try tackling a project that you struggle to get around too due to time to surprise your partner. The mental stress of the “to-do” list can many times get in the way of intimacy.

Gifts: includes receiving mementos that show genuine value and love towards the other person.

  • If your primary love language is acts of service, you feel appreciated when your partner brings a token or memento to show they were thinking about you.
  • TIP: If your lover’s primary love language is gifts, try picking up simple trinkets for your loved one when you travel for work without them to show you thought of them during your experience. The physical item will hold a feeling of gratitude for your partner, no matter the amount spent.

Many times the way we best show admiration, does not align with our partners authentic love language.

If you are struggling to increase intimacy in your relationship understanding your partner in a more in depth manner may be key!

Wishing you an abundance of loving energy Valentines Day!

Michelle Smith

LMHC, MS

(305) 204-6378

Buy 5 Love Languages on Amazon